UCI

2002 PPIC Statewide Survey: December 2002
Special Survey of Orange County
Public Policy Institute of California
in collaboration with the
University of California, Irvine

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Funding Transportation Projects Through Local Sales Tax 
Measure M Sales Tax
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2002 Survey
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University of California, Irvine
2002 UC Regents

Measure M Sales Tax

Most Orange County residents today (68%) are satisfied with the way that Measure M tax revenues are being used for transportation projects in the county. Fourteen percent report being very satisfied with the allocation of these funds, another 54 percent say they are somewhat satisfied, and 18 percent say they are not satisfied. This assessment is very much in line with opinions over the past few years (for example, a 68% satisfaction rating in 2000). However, these results are markedly changed from the first ratings in 1992, when only 48 percent of the county's registered voters reported being very or somewhat satisfied with the way these funds were being used.

North and South County residents are about equally satisfied with the way Measure M funds are being used (70% and 65%), as are Democrats and Republicans (69% and 64%), while Latinos are much more satisfied than whites (82% versus 64%). County residents across age, education, and income groups express satisfaction with the implementation of this local tax.

When it comes to extending the Measure M sales tax beyond the current 2011 expiration date, 62 percent of all adults, as well as 62 percent of registered voters, say they would vote to continue the tax for another 20 years. Support for the extension is higher than it was in the 2000 Orange County Survey, when 55 percent of registered voters said they would vote yes on such a measure. However, even at 62 percent, the measure would fail to meet the two-thirds vote requirement.

Most Democrats (71%) would vote to extend Measure M, compared to less than two-thirds of independents (60%) and barely half of Republicans (53%). There are no differences between North and South County residents. Majority, but not two-thirds, support for extending Measure M, is found among whites, homeowners, older, college educated, and higher-income residents.

If the half-cent sales tax measure in Orange County were expanded to include "other infrastructure projects" as well as local transportation, 62 percent of registered voters would support it, and thus the measure would still fail to meet the two-thirds threshold for passing a local sales tax.

 


All Adults

Party Registration

Democrat

Republican

Independent

How satisfied are you with the way Measure M funds are being used for transportation projects in Orange County?

Very satisfied

14%

17%

11%

13%

Somewhat satisfied

54

52

53

60

Not satisfied

18

17

21

17

Don't know

14

14

15

10

If an election were held today, would you vote yes or no on an Orange County ballot measure to extend the half-cent sales tax another 20 years?

Yes

62%

71%

53%

60%

No

30

22

39

32

Don't know

8

7

8

8